Uncategorized

Get PDF Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind book. Happy reading Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind Pocket Guide.

The fallibility of the human mind is a source of continual frustration to philosophers, artificial intelligencers and evolutionary psychologists.

Customer Reviews

Our memories are weak, we are credulous and easily led to believe improbable or impossible things, our language is not optimally constructed. We have problems with probabilities, and are logically inconsistent.


  1. ‎Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind on Apple Books?
  2. Kluge: The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind : The Haphazard Construction of the Human Mind.
  3. Site Search Navigation?
  4. Kluge (book) - Wikipedia;

We make choices that are apparently irrational and not in our own best long-term interests, and certainly not in those of our genes. Thus - according to Marcus - we prefer instant gratification to the chance of greater, longer-term benefits.


  • The Skeptical Juror and the Trial of Byron Case.
  • The Herald Society (25 September 2007)?
  • Reward Yourself?
  • We get drunk, embark on non-procreative sex for mere pleasure, and may even sacrifice our lives for some perceived cause that has nothing to do with increasing our inclusive genetic fitness. All these are well-known human traits, and they shouldn't really cause Marcus, a social psychologist, as much surprise as he feigns, as he races the reader through example after example of the ways that humans fail to live up to the expectations of logicians.

    The book's breezy style is evidently attuned to an American market in which the target reader is - in Marcus's own phrase - "Joe Sixpack" or, presumably, his female partner. I find the style off-putting, but this may be ascribed to a residual cisatlantic snobbery. What is refreshing is the way in which Marcus uses his material en route to quietly dispose not merely of creationism but also of the wilder reaches of evolutionary psychology, with its claims of a human mind adapted to Pleistocene living.

    His chapter on language as a kluge, full of grammatical and linguistic incongruities, is particularly strong, although his basic argument is almost drowned in a flood of examples. It involves him in some significant giant-slaying as he takes on not only Noam Chomsky but also, by implication, Steven Pinker, although this hasn't inhibited the latter from providing a generous jacket commendation for the book. Yet, for all this, Marcus's analysis shares a fault with the evolutionary psychologists he criticises: the unquestioning assumption of timeless and contextless human universals, the magisterial "we" who share the mental frailties he anatomises.

    His account is class-, gender- and culture-blind. Sure, as he demonstrates, English is a kluge, but is this true in the same way of Chinese or Urdu? Evidence, he says, of the failure of evolution to develop protective mechanisms and implicitly another argument against design.


    • Similar books and articles.
    • Ginger Pye;
    • Find in a library : Kluge : the haphazard construction of the human mind.
    • Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius?
    • Minds are slow, noisy, error-prone but highly intelligent. Computers are designed, minds have evolved. Deep Blue could beat Garry Kasparov at a game demanding cognitive strategies but ask it to escape from a predator, find food or a mate and negotiate the complex interactions of social life outside the chessboard or express emotion when it lost a game and it couldn't even leave the launchpad.

      Join Kobo & start eReading today

      Yet these are the skills that human survival depends on, the products of 3 billion years of evolution. Evolutionary processes can only select from among minor variants of what is there already.

      Kluge The Haphazard Evolution of the Human Mind

      This means that human brains carry the traces of our ancestry, such as eyes that are wired inside out meaning that light entering the eye has to pass through a layer of nerve cells before it meets the retina , and seemingly redundant "lower" brain structures whose functions, important in the lives of reptiles, have now been taken over by our massively overdeveloped cerebral cortex. Such engineering nightmares are, as Gary Marcus points out, the reverse of anything resembling intelligent design.

      In his words, our brains and minds are supreme kluges, a kluge being an engineer's term for a clumsy solution to a design problem - an "ill-assorted collection of poorly matching parts forming a distressing whole", in the words of the computer pioneer Jackson Granholm.

      Gary Marcus Ph.D. | Psychology Today

      The fallibility of the human mind is a source of continual frustration to philosophers, artificial intelligence specialists and evolutionary psychologists. Our memories are weak, we are credulous and easily led to believe improbable or impossible things, our language is not optimally constructed. We have problems with probabilities and are logically inconsistent.

      We make choices that are apparently irrational and not in our own best long-term interests, and certainly not in those of our genes. Thus, according to Marcus, we prefer instant gratification to the chance of greater, longer-term benefits. We get drunk, embark on non-procreative sex for mere pleasure and may even sacrifice our lives for some perceived cause that has nothing to do with increasing our inclusive genetic fitness. All of these are well-known human traits and they shouldn't really cause Marcus, a social psychologist, as much surprise as he feigns as he races the reader through example after example of the ways humans fail to live up to the expectations of logicians.

      The book's breezy style is evidently attuned to an American market in which the target reader is - in Marcus's own phrase - "Joe Sixpack" or, presumably, his female partner.

      The haphazard construction of the human mind

      I find the style off-putting but this may be ascribed to a residual transatlantic snobbery.